AdamDutko

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Adam Dutko

Hello. My name is Adam. I first started using linux around 1998. Since then I've used many distributions, but my favorites are currently RHEL and FC. If you would like to know more, please contact me using: gnome<>a<>t<>dux (dash) linux <dot> orG . The dash is really a - (minus the single quotes). I currently participate, on a less than desired frequency, to the Docs project (hopefully I will have an RPM and build tutorial soon) and as a Fedora Package maintainer.


Update (061807): I've been sponsored as a reviewer! WOOO HOO! Mrxvt will soon be in Fedora and I will be submitting another package soon, but that one is a surprise!

Update (070407): I will also start publishing rpms for astyle. I should have it ready for publication/review by 070607. I've also built packages for akamaru.

Update (070507): Mrxvt 0.5.2 will be in the next version of Fedora and pushed to updates soon! I'm also part of the group going to OhioLinuxFest to work the Fedora booth.

DNA -- Feature Tracker

So, the idea for DNA came from a fsco meeting. How do we focus the "firehose" known as feature requests into a metered stream with the least amount of administrative overhead possible, while simultaneously incorporating features end-users want, and software that will not "die on the vine?" One approach is to create a statistically driven decision engine that will help solid requests rise to the top, similar to the analogy of "the cream always rises to the top." The decision engine uses data entered by the person requesting the feature, in addition to data it finds on the internet about the topic (one easy metric generator is --> www.sucksrocks.com), votes from Fedora contributors (votes from contributors will count more, just like votes from @redhat.com e-mail addresses, than the average user), and etc. to determine how to rank the request in the pool. Bases upon how the metrics are weighted or if the distribution maintainers override the requests, features will rise and fall with popularity, then once they reach a peak (constant hum/buzz from the community), they can popped off the top and put into the next distribution. Of course, items can (and probably will sometimes) be "picked" from the stack.


My personal site is located at: http://littlehat.homelinux.org:8000