Documentation Networking Beat

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Many older phones support mobile broadband sharing to computers through Bluetooth Dial-Up Networking (DUN). When the phone is paired with a computer, the computer may request that the phone provide a virtual serial port, and then the computer treats that virtual serial port as a normal mobile broadband connection card, sending AT commands and starting PPP.
 
Many older phones support mobile broadband sharing to computers through Bluetooth Dial-Up Networking (DUN). When the phone is paired with a computer, the computer may request that the phone provide a virtual serial port, and then the computer treats that virtual serial port as a normal mobile broadband connection card, sending AT commands and starting PPP.
  
Enhanced functionality in the gnome-bluetooth plugin allows users to set up their network connection with a few clicks, after which the phone and the network connection are available from the nm-applet menu.
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Enhanced functionality in the gnome-bluetooth plugin allows users to set up their network connection with a few clicks, after which the phone and the network connection are available from the nm-applet menu.
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 +
Fedora user now will only have one tool to use instead of having to use a 3rd-party tool that doesn't fully function with Fedora.
 
Possible related feature pages:
 
Possible related feature pages:
 
* [[Features/NetworkManagerBluetoothDUN |NetworkManager Bluetooth DUN ]]
 
* [[Features/NetworkManagerBluetoothDUN |NetworkManager Bluetooth DUN ]]

Revision as of 03:45, 23 April 2010

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NetworkManager Bluetooth DUN

Many older phones support mobile broadband sharing to computers through Bluetooth Dial-Up Networking (DUN). When the phone is paired with a computer, the computer may request that the phone provide a virtual serial port, and then the computer treats that virtual serial port as a normal mobile broadband connection card, sending AT commands and starting PPP.

Enhanced functionality in the gnome-bluetooth plugin allows users to set up their network connection with a few clicks, after which the phone and the network connection are available from the nm-applet menu.

Fedora user now will only have one tool to use instead of having to use a 3rd-party tool that doesn't fully function with Fedora. Possible related feature pages: