How to create xorg.conf

From FedoraProject

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(create page, we need a nice central explanation of how to create xorg.conf)
 
(remove system-config-display stuff, it's no longer applicable)
 
(5 intermediate revisions by 5 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
Fedora releases since {{FedoraVersion|long|10}} do not create a {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file, used to configure the X server, by default. The X configuration is automatically determined each time X is started. In most cases, this works well and there is no need to manually specify X configuration information.
 
Fedora releases since {{FedoraVersion|long|10}} do not create a {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file, used to configure the X server, by default. The X configuration is automatically determined each time X is started. In most cases, this works well and there is no need to manually specify X configuration information.
  
If you need to make manual changes to X configuration for any reason, you will first need to create a {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file. There are several ways of doing this.
+
If you need to make manual changes to X configuration for any reason, you will first need to create a {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file.  
  
== system-config-display ==
+
== Xorg -configure ==
  
If you have the {{package|system-config-display}} package installed, you can use the ''system-config-display'' command to create a configuration file. You can run it interactively simply by running <tt>system-config-display</tt> as root (or find it in the system menus under System > Administration > Display). This may not work if you cannot run X at all. In this case, you can run it non-interactively by using the <tt>--noui</tt> parameter, like so:
+
You can create a basic {{filename|xorg.conf}} using the X executable itself. As root run:
<pre>
+
system-config-display --noui
+
</pre>
+
This will create a clean {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file using the automatically detected driver for your video card. If you wish to specify a particular driver for your card you can simply create a standard {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}} file and then edit it by hand, but you can also do this directly with ''system-config-display''. For example, to specify the ''nv'' driver, you could do:
+
<pre>
+
system-config-display --noui --set-driver=nv
+
</pre>
+
When using the --set parameters, --noui is implied, so you do not really need to include it.
+
 
+
== Xorg -configure ==
+
  
If you do not have the {{package|system-config-display}} package installed and cannot easily install it (for instance, you are stuck without X, and networking is not working), you can create a basic {{filename|xorg.conf}} using the X executable itself. As root, run:
 
 
<pre>
 
<pre>
Xorg -configure
+
Xorg :1 -configure
 
</pre>
 
</pre>
This will create the file {{filename|/root/xorg.conf.new}}, which you can then move to {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}}:
+
This will create the file {{filename|/root/xorg.conf.new}}, which you can then copy to {{filename|/etc/X11/xorg.conf}}:
 
<pre>
 
<pre>
mv /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf
+
cp /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf
 
</pre>
 
</pre>
and edit according to your needs. Note that this will only work if no X server is currently running.
+
and edit according to your needs.

Latest revision as of 22:57, 6 August 2011

Fedora releases since Fedora 10 do not create a /etc/X11/xorg.conf file, used to configure the X server, by default. The X configuration is automatically determined each time X is started. In most cases, this works well and there is no need to manually specify X configuration information.

If you need to make manual changes to X configuration for any reason, you will first need to create a /etc/X11/xorg.conf file.

[edit] Xorg -configure

You can create a basic xorg.conf using the X executable itself. As root run:

Xorg :1 -configure

This will create the file /root/xorg.conf.new, which you can then copy to /etc/X11/xorg.conf:

cp /root/xorg.conf.new /etc/X11/xorg.conf

and edit according to your needs.