Improving the Docs Project workflow - Advancing the Project and Community

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UNDER REVISION
These notes were created long, long ago and don't accurately reflect Docs Project work flow anymore. This document is being revised to reflect the adoption of Publican and other changes.

Advancing the Project and Community

The beauty of FLOSS (Free as in Livre [Freedom] Open Source Software) is the community of creative people involved in the FLOSS movement. They are faced with the same challenges as we face. Likewise, there are many creative and innovative solutions. Now more than ever, it is important to support one another in promoting FLOSS tools to encourage freedom of choice.

The common challenge is to create useful FLOSS documentation in a timely manner. The documentation must be continually updated as the software and projects evolve. It must be simple to understand yet comprehensive. The documentation must be easily translated into dozens of languages. It must be easily revised and distributed in a variety of display and publishing formats (HTML, PDF, PostScript, etc.).

The entire FLOSS community will benefit from a completely "free as in freedom" tool chain for creating, distributing, storing, and publishing FLOSS documents/content.

FLOSS Docs the FLOSS Way

A completely free (as in freedom) and automated toolchain would be of tremendous benefit to the Fedora Project as well as the FOSS community-at-large.

Related Topics For Discussion

  1. Upstream contribution to other documentation projects (for example, GNOME).
  2. Improvements to document conversion tools.
  3. Better communication (VoIP, online presence tools like MugShot)
  4. Cross-stream collaboration, working with documentation teams from other projects (such as other distributions and upstream projects) to create or contribute to a documentation commons.
  5. Offline wiki editing, such as using Gedit with the "Tag Lines" plugin. Any popular editor can also be used, as long as tagline features exist or can be easily added.
  6. Offline DocBook editing. See DocBook Authoring Tools .
  7. OpenOffice.org and DocBook. See OOoDocBook and OpenOffice and DocBook .
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