QA:Testcase Anaconda User Interface serial console

From FedoraProject

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Add virt tip)
(change instructions to use virtualization, which is much more accessible)
(7 intermediate revisions by 3 users not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{QA/Test_Case
 
{{QA/Test_Case
|description=
+
|description=This is to verify that [[Anaconda]] installation works over a serial console and the installed system uses it as well. Because computers with serial ports are very scarce today, this test case will describe testing in a [[Virtualization|virtualized environment]], where we can easily emulate that. However, if you have a bare-metal hardware that support serial connections, you can use it instead.
This test is intended to ensure that the console= parameter is honored and the post-installed systems is configured properly for a non tty0 console. While the examples mention the use of ''console=ttyS0'', it it acceptable to use any device other than the default ''tty0''.
+
|setup=
{{Admon/note|Serial Cable?| This test case may require using a DB-9 serial cable to connect to the system under test.   Additionally, you may be required to update the BIOS to enable the serial port.}}
+
# Install a virtualization software that supports serial console emulation. The following instructions are related to {{package|virt-manager}}.
{{Admon/tip|Go Virtual|Since the focus of this test is not to validate the physical DB-9 serial cable connection, or to ensure the cables are seated properly, it is entirely acceptable (and ''encouraged'') to use [[Virtualization]]. For example, creating any KVM/QEMU virtual guest with the correct ''console{{=}}ttyS0 serial'' will setup a serial console for use with this test.}}
+
# Prepare any non-live installation media (anything except {{filename|Live.iso}}).
 +
# Prepare a virtual machine in virt-manager and attach the installation media, but don't start it yet.
 
|actions=
 
|actions=
# Using a DB-9 serial cable, connect to your test system on the first port (typically S0) and start a serial port monitoring application (ttywatch, cermit, or minicom)
+
# Start the virtual machine and add <code>console=ttyS0 serial</code> boot options to the default boot menu item. Don't boot it yet.
# Boot installation program passing the console=ttyS0 command line parameter
+
# On your host system switch to a terminal and connect to the serial console of your virtual machine: <pre># virsh console <machine_name></pre>
# Complete installation and boot into installed system
+
# Switch back to the virtual machine and boot the installer.
 +
# Proceed with installation.
 +
# After the installation is complete and the system is restarted, make sure you are still connected to the serial console in the terminal and boot the new system.
 
|results=
 
|results=
# The installation displays properly works over the serial line
+
# The boot messages are printed to the serial console.
# Confirm that a login console is presented over the serial device
+
# The installer is started in a text mode on the serial console.
# When using ''upstart'' (Fedora9), you may confirm that the serial device is configured for login by examining the output of ''initctl''. For example,
+
# The installer is displayed properly and responds to user input properly.
#: <pre>serial (instance)
+
# The installed system displays [[GRUB]] boot menu to the serial console.
#: (start) running, process 1116</pre>
+
# The installed system prints boot messages to the serial console.
# When using ''sysvinit'' (prior to Fedora9), you may confirm that the file ''/etc/inittab'' has a login entry for the requested serial port. For example: <pre>co:2345:respawn:/sbin/agetty ttyS1 115200 vt100-nav</pre>
+
# The installed system present a working login prompt to the serial console.
# The file ''/etc/securetty'' contains a line matching the requested console
+
#* If this doesn't work, please attach output from {{command|systemctl status serial-getty@ttyS0.service}} command and {{filename|/etc/securetty}} file into the bug report.
 
}}
 
}}
 
[[Category:User Interface]]
 
[[Category:User Interface]]

Revision as of 12:54, 8 November 2012

Contents

Description

This is to verify that Anaconda installation works over a serial console and the installed system uses it as well. Because computers with serial ports are very scarce today, this test case will describe testing in a virtualized environment, where we can easily emulate that. However, if you have a bare-metal hardware that support serial connections, you can use it instead.

Setup

  1. Install a virtualization software that supports serial console emulation. The following instructions are related to Package-x-generic-16.pngvirt-manager.
  2. Prepare any non-live installation media (anything except Live.iso).
  3. Prepare a virtual machine in virt-manager and attach the installation media, but don't start it yet.

How to test

  1. Start the virtual machine and add console=ttyS0 serial boot options to the default boot menu item. Don't boot it yet.
  2. On your host system switch to a terminal and connect to the serial console of your virtual machine:
    # virsh console <machine_name>
  3. Switch back to the virtual machine and boot the installer.
  4. Proceed with installation.
  5. After the installation is complete and the system is restarted, make sure you are still connected to the serial console in the terminal and boot the new system.

Expected Results

  1. The boot messages are printed to the serial console.
  2. The installer is started in a text mode on the serial console.
  3. The installer is displayed properly and responds to user input properly.
  4. The installed system displays GRUB boot menu to the serial console.
  5. The installed system prints boot messages to the serial console.
  6. The installed system present a working login prompt to the serial console.
    • If this doesn't work, please attach output from systemctl status serial-getty@ttyS0.service command and /etc/securetty file into the bug report.