Summer Coding 2010

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You need to be committed to working on your part of the Fedora Summer Coding 2010 for it to be successful.  You may want to work with another mentor (''co-mentoring'') to ensure there is always someone available to work with the student and other project members.
 
You need to be committed to working on your part of the Fedora Summer Coding 2010 for it to be successful.  You may want to work with another mentor (''co-mentoring'') to ensure there is always someone available to work with the student and other project members.
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=== How to comment on proposals ===
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{{:How to comment on Summer Coding 2010 proposals}}
  
 
== You are a sub-project ==
 
== You are a sub-project ==

Revision as of 15:44, 9 April 2010

The Fedora Summer Coding program connects students, mentors, sub-projects, and sponsors to provide coding opportunities as summer jobs.

This page has information for all the groups involved. (Short URL.)

Contents


General information

The Summer Coding 2010 schedule has the timeline of events.

The page Summer Coding 2010 is the central location to find information about the program.

To communicate with other people about Summer Coding 2010 use these resources:

  • General open discussion mailing list for 2010:
    Discussions between students, mentors, sub-projects, and upstreams.
    Weekly status report from students, in addition to blog.
    General program announcements; all students and mentors are required to be on this list.
    Occasional discussion, resolution, and decision on student project matters, as warranted.
  • IRC #fedora-summer-coding on irc.freenode.net (Web-based chat)
  • SIG mailing list
    How we are structuring and running the program - discussions and decisions.
    Anything related to program oversight, goals, short- and long-term plans - discussions and decisions.
  • Contact project leaders directly:
    • Karsten Wade
    • Patrick W. Barnes
    • Put yourself here if you are a leader and want to be contacted individually by those who need this communication channel.
  • Private mentors list

You are a student

This section is for students interested in contributing to the Fedora Project or JBoss.org through Fedora Summer Coding 2010.

If you have an idea or want to participate through Fedora or JBoss.org, you should already be looking around the community and communicating.

Timeline for students

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for students

  1. Learn about the program.
    Review the Summer Coding 2010 pages, look at the Summer Coding 2010 student proposal application and make sure this program is right for you.
  2. Find a project idea.
    You can propose your own idea starting 7 April, or look for inspiration among ideas posted by mentors on the Summer Coding 2010 ideas page.
    Note that on the schedule mentors have until 13 May to put ideas on the idea page. Check back for updates.
  3. Start communicating.
    Begin communicating with the community. Other members of the community can help you refine your idea, and you may meet potential mentors. You should contact sub-projects within the community that can provide mentors for your project idea, and you should join the discussion group.
  4. Set up an account.
    1. If you do not already have an account in the Fedora Account System, create one.
    2. On the project wiki https://fedoraproject.org/wiki, create a user page in the format of User:Yourusername. Do this by opening a new web browser tab and typing in the address https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/User:Yourusername, replacing Yourusername with your actual username.
  5. Create your single application page. The contents of this page are transcluded in to your proposal, which is a wiki tag to pull (include) the contents of one page in to another page.
    1. Right click on this page name and choose to open in a new tab: Summer Coding 2010 student application - Example Student.
    2. Open a new tab and type in the address https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Summer_Coding_2010_student_application_-_Your_Name. Replace Your_Name with your actual, real name, using an underscore '_' for the space. This is going to be your application page.
    3. Go to the first tab with the Example Student content and click on the edit link. When you have the page source, highlight and copy all of it.
    4. Go to the second tab with the Your Name title, and click the create tab on the top of the page. When you have the edit window open, paste in all of the content from the Example Student tab.
    5. Edit the content, using the included comments to guide you. Be sure to include the category tag at the bottom of the page:
      [[Category:Summer Coding 2010 student applications]]
    6. When saving the page check the Watch this page box, or click on the watch tab when the page is published.
  6. Draft your proposal.
    1. Right click on this page name and choose to open in a new tab: Summer Coding 2010 student proposal application.
    2. Open a new tab and put in the address https://fedoraproject.org/wiki/Summer_Coding_2010_proposal_-_Name_of_proposal. Replace Name_of_proposal with a proposal short name, using an underscore '_' for the space. Try for no more than seven words for the short name, if possible. This is going to be your proposal page.
    3. Go to the first tab with the proposal application and click on the edit link. When you have the page source, highlight and copy all of it.
    4. Go to the second tab with the Name_of_proposal title, and click the create tab on the top of the page. When you have the edit window open, paste in all of the content from the proposal application tab.
    5. In the source for the new wiki page, note the transclusion, which is a page name surrounded by curly braces:
      {{:Summer Coding 2010 student application - Example Student}}
    6. Replace the Example Student with Your Name from your application page name. Don't worry about the spaces, MediaWiki automatically includes the underscore when it makes the link.
    7. Fill out the rest of the proposal page content with information from your proposal.
    8. Be sure your page includes the category tag at the bottom of the page:
      [[Category:Summer Coding 2010 proposals]]
    9. When saving the page check the Watch this page box, or click on the watch tab when the page is published.
    10. Look at the saved page and make sure your application page information is transcluded properly. If you have any problems with making these pages work, use IRC to get help. Visit the page Communication for Summer Coding 2010 for more information.
  7. Keep communicating.
    We cannot overstress the importance of communication. Keep talking, and listening, to the discussion group, to the sub-projects relevant to your proposal and to potential mentors. Be patient, as mentors and other contributors are often very busy people.

Why spend your summer working on FOSS?

When you work in the open on free software, you create a body of work that follows you for the rest of your life. Rather than a coding assignment done by thousands of other students and relegated to the bottom of the bit drawer at semester's end, working in FOSS is a chance to contribute to a living project.

Working in FOSS gives you a chance to:

  • Work with real world large codebases.
  • Collaborate with real engineers and other professional experts.
  • Contribute to something meaningful while learning and earning student value.
  • Learn tools and processes that are just like what you are going to use if you work in technology after graduation.
  • Make friends and contacts around the globe.
  • Possibly attract attention that gets you an internship or job after graduation.

Why work with Fedora and JBoss.org?

Our projects are large and diverse. We are very experienced at working with new contributors and helping them be successful.

Many long-time contributors continue to be around, lending expertise and mentoring. People who stay around the community and do good work are noticed. They get hired for jobs from it, including being hired by Red Hat. Past Google Summer of Code students were hired by Red Hat, as well as interns in various positions. This is just an example, as experience and reputation in the JBoss.org and Fedora Project communities is influential on your career in many ways.

As long-standing communities with many facets, it is possible for you to find many rewarding sub-projects to work on.

You should know that contributing to FOSS doesn't require you to have super programming skills, or super-anything else. You just need be interested and curious enough, and be willing to become comfortable being productively lost. This is the state of learning through finding your way around and figuring things out.

Do you want to start from ideas mentors already have?

Mentors and sub-projects have put up sections on the Summer Coding 2010 ideas page. There you can find:

  • Full ideas that you might want to start on;
  • Suggestions and use cases, to help you make up your own idea;
  • Links to the sub-project/upstream where you can learn more.

For example, if you are interested in doing something for the RHQ Project, there is a link to an an ideas page on their website and how to contact the team. If you contact them, you can learn about even more ideas, and share some of your thinking.

Even if a mentor has an idea, you want to find one that inspires you. You must become part of the idea yourself.

Note.png
Mentors have until 14 April to finish idea pages
Mentors are updating those pages up until then, so it crosses over with the student schedule. If you see an idea you like, begin talking with the mentor immediately. Check back with the idea page regularly and put a watch on the page.

Do you have an idea you need a mentor for?

People can be most passionate about an idea that is their own. That passion can be what helps you get through the hard part of the project.

Do you know what person or sub-project in JBoss or Fedora that might be the mentoring group for your idea?

You need to do these things:

  1. Contact the relevant sub-project for your idea or contact the discussion group.
  2. Be prepared to explain your idea, receive input and criticism, and grow (or reduce) the idea so it has the best chance of being accepted for Fedora Summer Coding.
  3. Create an idea page, noting in the section for mentors that you are looking for a mentor. Use How to create an idea page for Summer Coding to make the page.

Are you already working in the Fedora or JBoss communities?

Students who are users, participants, or contributors in the Fedora and JBoss communities are encouraged to participate.

Do you have ideas for what you'd like to see in the project?

Are you working in an area of the project that might want to mentor you for your Summer Coding 2010 work? For example, if you write for the Fedora Documentation Project or translate for the Fedora Localization Project, talk with your group to see if there are ideas you can turn in to a student proposal, with another sub-project member as the mentor.

What are my chances of having a proposal accepted?

This is the first year we are running a solo summer coding program, and many details are being finalized in parallel with taking and reviewing proposals. For example, sponsors are still being sought, which affects the size of the funding pool. We'll announce this information as it is known and decided; final funding-per-student may vary and is dependent on the quality of proposals as well as size of funding pool.

We may not be able to fund as many projects as we ran under the Google Summer of Code, but our goal is on quality and not quantity.

We intend to run Fedora Summer Coding in the future. One idea is to run it for the summer in the Southern Hemisphere (Sep 2010 to Feb 2011). If you don't get in this round, keep trying! You are welcome to keep lurking and offering ways to help improve the program for future rounds.

You are a mentor

Wanting to be a mentor is a good thing. Join the discussion list and tell us about yourself, your project idea, and so forth.

You must be committed to work with the student and be a liaison between the student, sub-projects, upstreams, and the overall project (Fedora Project or JBoss.org.) You can come from a Fedora sub-project, an upstream such as a JBoss.org project, from a university or college sponsoring students, as a few examples.

After discussion on the main Summer Coding 2010 list, you will be invited to join the private mentor discussion list

Timeline for mentors

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for mentors

  1. You either have one or more ideas, or you want to assist generally with mentoring students.
    1. If you are generally interested, join the discussion list, introduce yourself, and offer to mentor. You have to decide if you want to be a full-time mentor for a student, a back-up mentor role, or one of the part-time presiding mentors who read applications, guide students and other mentors, and so forth.
  2. If you have an idea, you need to make an idea page for it following the directions from How to create an idea page for Summer Coding.
    1. When thinking about your idea, consider how to get the student personally invested -- the more they can make the ideas their own, the more they tend to get and give to the project. Compare this with an approach of coding to a hard specification.
  3. Once an idea page is up, including being part of Summer Coding 2010 ideas and you joining the discussion list, there are several directions you can go.
    1. You can sit with the idea and respond to queries on list or in IRC.
    2. You can do some publicity about your idea - blog post, FWN post, email to various lists, talk to students, IRC, etc.
    3. You can go all the way and help organize publicity - via universities, posters, etc. Fedora Marketing may be interested in helping.
  4. When questions come up, try to direct the questioner, questions, and answers to the list, and answer them there. The idea is to be transparent and reduce duplicate work.
  5. Add to the Summer Coding FAQ as often as you need. Use it as a reference even more often.
  6. Work with students on their proposals. Use the How to comment on Summer Coding 2010 proposals procedure and invite other mentors (via the mentors private discussion list) to discuss the proposal on it's talk page.
    1. The goal is to help the student do the best proposal they can; this is an exploration and research phase; conduct a code test and see how the personality fit works. Be sure to offer code tests and get-to-know-the-community sessions equally and fairly to all who want to propose.
    2. If possible, the proposal that is turned in should not need any further work from that due date.
    3. It is possible that while mentors discuss proposals after 20 May, they may want to request changes or ask questions of the proposals. Use How to comment on Summer Coding 2010 proposals for directions on reviewing proposals..
  7. If you have questions about any of the step so far, bring the questions to the discussion list. If it is a private matter, reach out to any of the experienced mentors.
  8. When all proposals are turned in, the mentors private discussion list is populated with all the mentors who are proposed and not yet on that list, then discussions ensue.
    1. Mentors decide which proposals get funded.
    2. Admin team does tie-break where there is no consensus.
    3. Ideally, mentors argue successfully on the merits of the proposal; all sub-projects are treated as equal.
    4. However, some funds may be earmarked for specific groups.

What to do with your ideas

Put them here on the Summer Coding ideas page. Reference How to create an idea page for Summer Coding when creating your idea.

We are looking in to using OpenHatch] for managing ideas. If you are interested in learning more about that, join us on the Summer Coding SIG mailing list.

How to work with students

One way is to provide an idea for students to work on. This idea might be very well planned out, in which case you may need a high-level of contact with the student to get it implemented correctly.

It is harder to find success where you are completely certain of how an idea needs to be implemented; finding a student with the skills and interest to implement a specific solution is a lot harder than finding a student with enough skills to respond to a use case need.

Where you can have looser ideas, you may be able to find a student who works as a sort-of intern who can implement a solution to a use case you have. In past experiences, students going after a use case are more likely to get somewhere with self-direction.

You may also want to work with a student who brings an idea to your sub-project. This requires a different level of communication throughout the project, but can be the most rewarding.

Mentor responsibilities

You are an essential part of the student's success, the project's success, and the success for your overall organization (Fedora, JBoss.org, or another).

Your responsibilities include:

  • Being an interface for an identified sub-project or SIG in Fedora or JBoss.org.
  • Helping students communicate with the overall project and any upstreams.
  • Be the final, accountable person for deciding if the student is successful or not, which affects payment.

Are you committed to working with all parties?

You need to be committed to working on your part of the Fedora Summer Coding 2010 for it to be successful. You may want to work with another mentor (co-mentoring) to ensure there is always someone available to work with the student and other project members.

How to comment on proposals

For Summer Coding 2010 this is the process to follow when commenting on student proposals.

  1. Conversations and especially decisions should happen on the Talk: page of the proposal.
  2. When commenting on a student's proposal, click on the discussion tab.
  3. The first time the Talk: page is used, it comes up as an empty page.
  4. Use a second-level section block to give the subject of your comment:
    == Subject of comment ==
  5. Make your comments throughout the section
  6. At the bottom of your comments, sign and date the block using the special tag for this: ~~~~. Convention is to precede the tildes with two dashes:
    This:
    ... blah blah blah, and so there. --~~~~
    Makes this: "... blah blah blah, and so there. --Quaid 15:34, 9 April 2010 (UTC)"
  7. To reply to a comment, use the edit link for that comment. When it is open for editing, go to the bottom to add your reply, adding it as a nested sub-section of the section you are commenting on. If the section is a second-level section block, use a third-level:
    === Subject of reply to another comment ===
  8. Be sure to sign your section with ~~~~.
  9. If you are adding a new section, you can edit the page, or use the + symbol that appears next to edit when you are viewing the Talk:... page.
    • If you do a straight edit, add your new comment on the bottom as a new section.
    • If you use the + to edit, the contents of the Subject/headline are the second-level section name. Fill out the body with your comments, and be sure to sign your section with ~~~~.
  10. For any discussions about proposals that happens on the summer-coding-discuss list, make sure to create a new section on the talk page. List any decisions made and link back to the thread(s) in the mailing list archives.
  11. Save all changes. For anyone who has a watch on this page, the discussion tab should show when there are new, unread discussion points for the viewer.

You are a sub-project

Sub-projects are teams working on discrete parts of the Fedora Project or JBoss.org. For example:

  • Fedora Infrastructure
  • RHQ
  • Fedora Docs Team
  • Drools
  • Fedora Website Team

Timeline for sub-projects

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for sub-projects

Summer Coding 2010 step-by-step for sub-projects

Working with students and the Summer Coding program

You can gain a lot of value from students working via the Summer Coding program in your sub-project area; read GSoC report 2009 for examples.

Your sub-project may need to identify a single mentor to work with the student, if the mentor doesn't come from somewhere else in Fedora/JBoss.org. In addition, you want a back-up mentor or, in some cases, co-mentors, to ensure continuity for the student and the rest of the sub-project.

If you have ideas/problems you want students to work on, they are best served to the students as use cases. If you do have a strong plan for execution, make that clear in the idea so the student knows it is more of a guided project.

Some experience shows that student projects have a higher success rate for all involved when more of the initial idea is from the student. Keep that in mind as you create ideas.

Ideas can be divided in to several parts for different students. There are no explicit limitations on how students may interact on multiple parts of a project. For example, two students could team build a new component instead of working on two discrete components separately.

You are a sponsoring organization

Fedora Summer Coding is about connecting sponsors (those with resources to share) with students (those with time, passion, and skills to share.)

Timeline for sponsoring organizations

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for sponsors

Summer Coding 2010 step-by-step for sponsors

Why you should be a sponsor?

What do you get out of it?

  • Positively impact FOSS projects.
  • Get your brand in front of smart students who want to work on FOSS.
  • Work on a community program that demonstrates how open source business is done.
  • See something you’d like coded be completed.
  • Other positive brand associations.

What you need to do

We need to start talking, soon.

What are the resources you can supply?

  1. Money to pay stipends to students for spending focused time on these FOSS projects. This is a cross between a summer job and an internship.
  2. Someone to help coordinate and to contribute as part of the Fedora Summer Coding special interest group (SIG).
  3. Mentors, especially if they work actively in sub-project or area the sponsor is supporting.

What does the Summer Coding program do?

The Fedora Summer Coding mentors sort the student ideas, generate the list of approved proposals, work with the students throughout the summer, and make sure you hear back about how things went.

It’s not necessary as a sponsor to have ideas of how your resources should be used, that’s what the Fedora Project and JBoss.org mentors and sub-projects are prepared to do.

You can learn more about the model we are using in this blog post, Summer Of Code Swimchart: Now With More Generic.

You are an upstream

Timeline for upstreams

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for upstreams

Summer Coding 2010 step-by-step for upstreams

Has a student brought a project idea to you?

Please join the discussion list and talk with us about it. We'll ask at least one member of your project to be on that list throughout the 2010 program. It is not a requirement, and you can best work it out with the student's assigned mentor.

Do you have one or more ideas you want exposed to students?

As long as the idea is relevant for the Fedora Summer Coding program, you can put it on the Summer Coding 2010 ideas page. Follow the process on that page.

As this is a program for the Fedora Project and JBoss.org, there must be some benefit to those projects for your upstream idea. When you bring the topic to the discussion list, be prepared to talk about that.

There must be a demonstrable benefit to Fedora, even if it is only updated code in a package. Another example is having a student do the work of getting your software packaged for Fedora. All of your ideas and ramifications should be topics on the discussion mailing list.

Are you committed to working with all parties?

A project needs a mentor. Throwing an idea over the wall on to the wiki page doesn't get it the attention it needs to be part of the Summer Coding program. If you put an idea out there but do not have a mentor in mind for it, it is left open to the Summer Coding mentors and administators to sort out.

When considering a proposal, the mentors look at the amount of connection with upstream is required, and how strong the communication channels are. A stronger connection means the proposal looks better.

You are a Campus Ambassador

Campus Ambassadors should work to guide new interests through this process. They should work in both generating interest in Fedora Summer Coding within the Fedora Community and also generating interest in Fedora within student contributors.

Campus Ambassadors should then guide new contributors in helping them get set up with mentors and helping submit their Summer Coding proposal. [edit] Campus Ambassadors - what

   * Students can have a quality intern-like experience working with Fedora/JBoss.org.
         o Money! Code! Fame! Success! Community! 
   * Sub-projects in JBoss.org and Fedora are ready to work with students.
   * This is right in your pocket, you can run with Summer Coding participation and make your school very successful.
   * You can make more students successful by being an additional mentor for students through the process.
   * Do you know someone at the university/college who wants to talk about partnering with Fedora Summer Coding? 

Timeline for Campus Ambassadors

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for Campus Ambassadors

Summer Coding 2010 step-by-step for Campus Ambassadors

You want to help organize

Timeline for organizers

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for organizers

These are the steps for participating as an organizer of Summer Coding 2010.

  1. Join the Summer Coding SIG (special interest group) mailing list. This list is used for these topics:
    • How we are structuring and running the program - discussions and decisions.
    • Anything related to program oversight, goals, short- and long-term plans - discussions and decisions.
  2. When you've joined 'summer-coding', introduce yourself to the list and say what your are interested in doing, relevant experience, why you want to help, and so forth. This helps us get to know you and be able to help guide you from the start.
  3. Join the summer-coding-discuss mailing list. This list is used for these topics:
    • Discussions between students, mentors, sub-projects, and upstreams.
    • Weekly status report from students, in addition to blog.
    • General program announcements; all students and mentors are required to be on this list.
    • Occasional discussion, resolution, and decision on student project matters, as warranted.
  4. Read through the pages in this category and its sub-categories: Category:Summer Coding 2010. Note any problems so they can be addressed on the SIG mailing list.

You are a member of the Fedora Project community

Timeline for Fedora Project community

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for Fedora community

Summer Coding 2010 step-by-step for Fedora community

You are a member of the JBoss.org community

Timeline for JBoss.org community

This schedule is ready for Summer Coding 2010. Join the discussion mailing list and/or watch this page to be updated about schedule changes.

Start dates are emphasized and deadlines are in bold emphasis for student items.

Idea.png
Deadlines are 23:59 UTC on the specified date
For example, if the deadline is 09 August, all work must be in for mentor review by 23:59 UTC on 09 August. You must adjust for your own timezone, meaning the deadline may be at a different time of the day for you locally.
  • April
    7 April - Students can begin submitting applications
  • May
    Whole month - students, mentors, and sub-projects get to know each other
    13 May - Mentors need to finish idea pages
    20 May - Students applications + proposals need to be in
    21 May - Sponsors must pledge funding by this point
    24 May - Organizers finalize how many applications will be accepted
    27 May - Mentors + admins finalize rank-ordered list
    28 May - Students informed yes/no about application
  • June
    Whole month - code, interact
    01 June - Project begins (depending on proposal)
Note.png
Proposals may have a modified schedule included.
  • July
    05 July - Midterm evaluations period begins
    05 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (first, soft deadline)
    08 July - Student midterm deadline for evaluation (final deadline)
    12 July - Midterm evaluations due from mentors
  • August
    09 August - Project coding completes
    16 August - Students final report, code snapshot, and evaluations due
    20 August - Mentor evaluations due for students
    23 August - Final evaluations due back to students
    25 August - Mentor, sub-project evaluations of the Summer Coding program requested
  • September
    01 September - Sponsors receive report from organizers
    06 September - Sponsors release and deliver funds (proposed date)

Step-by-step for JBoss.org community

Summer Coding 2010 step-by-step for JBoss.org community