User Guide - Connecting to the Internet

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Fedora includes a graphical tool to help configure various connections and network interfaces, which this chapter will demonstrate how to use. In Fedora 8 Network Manager is included by default and allows easy management of configured connections.

Contents

GNOME

To launch the Network Configuration Tool in GNOME, navigate to the System > Administration > Network menu entry. When working as a regular user the application prompts for the root password.

KDE

To launch the Network Configuration Tool in KDE, navigate to the KMenu > Applications > System > Network menu entry. When working as a regular user the application prompts for the root password.

Configuring PPPoE

PPPoE connections are primarily used for xDSL connections. PPPoE stands for PPP over Ethernet.

In the main screen, click the New Button and then choose XDSL Configuration from the left hand column, clicking the Next button to proceed.

In the following screen, enter the name of the xDSL provider, and the username and password belonging to this account. When more than one Ethernet device is present on the system, ensure the correct device is selected from the drop down menu labeled Ethernet device. Click Next to proceed.

To configure this network connection to start when the system boots, click the appropriate entry in the main dialog, and then click the Edit button. Ensure that the Active device when computer starts box is ticked. To learn how to manually activate this connection see the Network Manager section.

DHCP Connection

DHCP connections are common when using cable-modems, LANs, and most SOHO broadband providers.

Note.png
DHCP is enabled by default
Fedora configures network interfaces to use DHCP by default. Follow these directions if DHCP was deactivated at some point.

To enable DHCP for a particular network interface, launch Network Manager, select the appropriate entry for the interface and click Edit. Ensure that the Automatically obtain IP address settings with is selected and set to DHCP.

Static IP Address

To configure a network interface for a static IP address, click on the network interface in the main dialog, and then click the Edit button. Next ensure that Statically IP addresses is marked, filling in the appropriate details in the Manual IP Address section.

For a static IP address, it is also necessary to fill in the details under the DNS tab of the main interface.

Network Manager

Network Manager is not enabled by default in Fedora, it is installed by default however. Enabling Network Manager is a simple process of going to System > Administration > Services and checking Network Manager and Network Manager Dispatcher.

Note.png
Make sure to save the modifications otherwise the changes will not be written to file. To start them straight away you will need to highlight Network Manager and Network Manager Dispatcher and click the start button.

The programs simplify the process of connecting your laptop or desktop to the network. When you have enabled the programs you should see the nm-applet icon which looks like the one below.

Docs Drafts DesktopUserGuide ConfiguringInternet nm-applet.png

When it has been enabled you can right click on the icon and enable wireless or wired networks. Enabling both does not affect how Network Manager operates.

If you have a wireless network and it is supported by Fedora left clicking on the icon and selecting Connect to other network and putting the details of your connection will cause Network Manager to use that information to connect to the network.

Wireless

Fedora includes some wireless firmware and methods to install closed source firmware. Network Manager in GNOME and KNetwork Manager in KDE are made to automatically function with the drivers that you installed in Fedora.

Fedora has available from the repositories the following wireless drivers:

Firmware Name Firmware Description
ipw2100-firmware Intel IPW2100
iwl3945-firmware Intel IPW3945
iwl4965-firmware Intel IPW4965
b43 Broadcom PCI/Cardbus
b43legacy Broadcom PCI/Cardbus
adm8211 Admtek PCI/Cardbus
p54 Prism54 USB and PCI/Cardbus
zd1211rw Zydas USB
rtl8180 Realtek PCI/Cardbus
rtl8187 Realtek USB
rt2x00 Ralink USB and PCI/Cardbus
ath5k Atheros PCI/Cardbus
ipw2200 Intel IPW2200
orinoco/hostap Prism2

If you need any of the following firmware install the software using Pirut by going to Applications > Add/Remove Software or if you require the iwl3945 firmware for example.

su -c 'yum install iwl3945'

If the software doesn't show up you can search for the software by going to the search tab in Pirut or:

su -c 'yum search orinoco'
Note.png
A current bug with some of the firmware is that the wireless light is not enabled, this does not mean the wireless card is turned off

KDE Network Manager

In Fedora 8 KDE uses GNOME nm-applet as opposed to knetworkmanager.

Network Manager is not enabled by default in Fedora, it is installed by default however. Enabling Network Manager is a simple process of going to KMenu > Applications > System > Services and checking Network Manager and Network Manager Dispatcher.

Note.png
Make sure to save the modifications otherwise the changes will not be written to file. To start them straight away you will need to highlight Network Manager and Network Manager Dispatcher and click the start button.

The programs simplify the process of connecting your laptop or desktop to the network. When you have enabled the programs you should see the nm-applet icon which looks like the one below in your taskbar.

Docs Drafts DesktopUserGuide ConfiguringInternet nm-applet.png

When it has been enabled you can right click on the icon and enable wireless or wired networks. Enabling both does not affect how Network Manager operates.

If you have a wireless network and it is supported by Fedora left clicking on the icon and selecting Connect to other network and putting the details of your connection will cause Network Manager to use that information to connect to the network.

Remote Desktop

Fedora has remote desktop as part of the default install.

Desktop Program Icon Menu location
Gnome Docs Drafts DesktopUserGuide ConfiguringInternet gnome-remote-desktop.png System > Preferences > Internet and Network
KDE Docs Drafts DesktopUserGuide ConfiguringInternet kde-remote-desktop.png KMenu > Applications > Settings

Enabling Desktop Sharing is as simple as ticking the Allow other users to view your desktop. If you would like other people to control your desktop you can tick the appropriate setting.

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