Changes/CockpitManagementConsole

From FedoraProject

< Changes(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
(Benefit to Fedora)
(How To Test)
Line 129: Line 129:
  
 
<!-- REQUIRED FOR SYSTEM WIDE CHANGES -->
 
<!-- REQUIRED FOR SYSTEM WIDE CHANGES -->
<Cockpit devs: please fill in>
+
 
 +
* Start the Cockpit service (or enable socket-activation)
 +
* Connect to the Cockpit port with a web browser
 +
* Flip switches, press buttons.
 +
 
 +
(To be filled out in more detail later)
  
 
== User Experience ==
 
== User Experience ==

Revision as of 15:36, 8 April 2014


Contents

Cockpit Management Console

Summary

The Fedora Server Product will ship the Cockpit Project as available by default, providing an approachable tool for system management.

Owner

  • Product: Fedora Server
  • Responsible WG: Fedora Server WG

Current status

  • Targeted release: Fedora 21
  • Last updated: 2014-04-01
  • Tracker bug: <will be assigned by the Wrangler>

Detailed Description

Cockpit is a server manager that makes it easy to administer your GNU/Linux servers via a web browser.

Easy to use

Cockpit is perfect for new sysadmins, allowing them to easily perform simple tasks such as storage administration, inspecting journals and starting and stopping services.

No interference

Jumping between the terminal and the web tool is no problem. A service started via Cockpit can be stopped via the terminal. Likewise, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface.

Multi-server

You can monitor and administer several servers at the same time. Just add them with a single click and your machines will look after its buddies.

Benefit to Fedora

Fedora Server will benefit from having a simple and powerful graphical interface for managing systems. This will make Fedora Server more approachable to less-experienced administrators, as well as providing a set of new tools for veterans.

Some of the specific capabilities that Cockpit provides:

  • Systemd service management
  • Journal log viewer
  • Storage setup, including LVM
  • Basic Network configuration
  • Add and Remove local users

Cockpit runs fine on headless servers, and makes it easy to access a server remotely. It aims to be useful along side other tools already in Fedora, and so will be useful to administrators, even if it doesn't yet solve every last need.

Scope

There are three primary goals for the initial release of Cockpit in Fedora Server. In descending order of importance:

  1. Inclusion of Cockpit as part of the default (not necessarily minimal) install set for Fedora Server
  2. Support for deploying and configuring the Domain Controller Server Role.
  3. Support for deploying and configuring the Database Server Role.
  • Proposal owners:
    • Support for a modular architecture (to support role-deployment snap-ins)
    • [more]
  • Other developers: Support for Server Roles provided by the Server SIG
  • Release engineering: Inclusion of cockpit into comps.xml
  • Policies and guidelines: N/A

Upgrade/compatibility impact

As Fedora 21 will be the first version of Fedora Server, there will be no existing system from which to upgrade.

This Change should have no impact on users upgrading from Fedora 20 (with no Product identification).

How To Test

  • Start the Cockpit service (or enable socket-activation)
  • Connect to the Cockpit port with a web browser
  • Flip switches, press buttons.

(To be filled out in more detail later)

User Experience

Users will have access to a powerful web-based user interface for managing their system.

Dependencies

Contingency Plan

  • Contingency mechanism: (What to do? Who will do it?)
    • If portions of the above goals cannot be completed, they will be dropped from the bottom-up.
  • Contingency deadline: N/A (not a System Wide Change)
  • Blocks release? Yes
  • Blocks product? Fedora Server
    • Shipping Cockpit on the default media of Fedora Server is blocking. The other goals are not.

Documentation

http://cockpit-project.org/

Release Notes