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=== PulseAudio flat volumes disabled ===
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In the Fedora 24 release, PulseAudio's standard flat volume configuration has been disabled. This disablement means the system volume no longer scales with the loudest application. Previously, it was possible for an application to set its volume to 100% on launch. This could potentially cause volumes to become suddenly loud, which poses a risk to users or their speakers or other hardware. The tradeoff for disabling this feature is that users may need to manually manage their application sound volumes more often. However, this behavior is in line with many other Linux distributions. The upstream PulseAudio, freedesktop.org, GNOME, and other communities are discussing new ways to mitigate this issue in future.
  
 
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Revision as of 19:14, 28 March 2016

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PulseAudio flat volumes disabled

In the Fedora 24 release, PulseAudio's standard flat volume configuration has been disabled. This disablement means the system volume no longer scales with the loudest application. Previously, it was possible for an application to set its volume to 100% on launch. This could potentially cause volumes to become suddenly loud, which poses a risk to users or their speakers or other hardware. The tradeoff for disabling this feature is that users may need to manually manage their application sound volumes more often. However, this behavior is in line with many other Linux distributions. The upstream PulseAudio, freedesktop.org, GNOME, and other communities are discussing new ways to mitigate this issue in future.