From Fedora Project Wiki

< FWN‎ | Beats

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[[SilasSewell|Silas Sewell]] described<ref>http://www.silassewell.com/blog/2009/05/04/managing-large-networks-with-puppet/</ref> how  <code>Puppet</code> can be used to manage large networks. "Puppet is an open source configuration management tool written in Ruby. It allows a systems administrator to define how a system should be configured using Puppet’s declarative language. Each Puppet client pulls its catalog at a regular interval and figures out how to make the catalog definitions true for the local operating system."
 
[[SilasSewell|Silas Sewell]] described<ref>http://www.silassewell.com/blog/2009/05/04/managing-large-networks-with-puppet/</ref> how  <code>Puppet</code> can be used to manage large networks. "Puppet is an open source configuration management tool written in Ruby. It allows a systems administrator to define how a system should be configured using Puppet’s declarative language. Each Puppet client pulls its catalog at a regular interval and figures out how to make the catalog definitions true for the local operating system."
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Silas also packaged<ref>http://www.silassewell.com/blog/2009/05/07/scribe-scalable-real-time-log-aggregation-for-centos-5-rhel-5/</ref> <code>Scribe</code>, "a server for aggregating log data streamed in real time from a large number of servers" (written by Facebook).
  
 
[[VenkateshHariharan|Venkatesh Hariharan]] quoted<ref>http://osindia.blogspot.com/2009/05/andy-grove-patents-are-like-mortgage.html</ref> Andy Grove (former Chairman and CEO of Intel) "comparing how patents have become like the mortgage-backed securities that caused the current financial meltdown".
 
[[VenkateshHariharan|Venkatesh Hariharan]] quoted<ref>http://osindia.blogspot.com/2009/05/andy-grove-patents-are-like-mortgage.html</ref> Andy Grove (former Chairman and CEO of Intel) "comparing how patents have become like the mortgage-backed securities that caused the current financial meltdown".
  
 
[[AdamWilliamson|Adam Williamson]] updated<ref>http://www.happyassassin.net/2009/05/06/the-fedora-bug-process/</ref> the [[BugZappers/BugStatusWorkFlow|Fedora Bug Process]] wiki page. "One significant thing it formalizes was discussed at the QA meeting this morning: what happens when a Rawhide bug gets fixed." Adam also "re-arranged it in a more logical order, wikified it, and added a lot more detail on bits of the process, states, and resolutions that weren’t previously covered. It also now explicitly mentions which resolutions and states are valid for Fedora and which aren’t."
 
[[AdamWilliamson|Adam Williamson]] updated<ref>http://www.happyassassin.net/2009/05/06/the-fedora-bug-process/</ref> the [[BugZappers/BugStatusWorkFlow|Fedora Bug Process]] wiki page. "One significant thing it formalizes was discussed at the QA meeting this morning: what happens when a Rawhide bug gets fixed." Adam also "re-arranged it in a more logical order, wikified it, and added a lot more detail on bits of the process, states, and resolutions that weren’t previously covered. It also now explicitly mentions which resolutions and states are valid for Fedora and which aren’t."
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[[User:Jkeating|Jesse Keating]] mused<ref>http://jkeating.livejournal.com/68883.html</ref> about the similarities between cooking popcorn (mmm popcorn...) and releasing software.
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[[User:Valent|Valent Turkovic]] wrote<ref>http://kernelreloaded.blog385.com/index.php/archives/volunerability-scanning-with-fedora-openvas/</ref> about installing <code>OpenVAS</code>, the Open Vulnerability Assessment System (a fork from <code>Nessus</code> after it went closed-source) in Fedora.
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[[User:Samuelig|Samuel Iglesias]] shared<ref>http://blog.samuelig.es/?p=278</ref> some basic <code>vim</code> tips. Regardless of your preferred editor, <code>vi</code> is generally installed <i>everywhere</i> so it is useful to know the basic.
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[[User:Katzj|Jeremy Katz]] followed-up<ref>http://velohacker.com/fedora-notes/ppc-and-fedora-whats-next/</ref> from his previous post (mentioned in [[FWN/Issue174#General|FWN Issue 174]]) on the relevance of PPC as a primary Fedora architecture. At this week's Fedora Board meeting, "the Board voted and decided that from the Board level, PPC is no longer required to be a primary arch." Jeremy added "That does not mean that PPC is now automatically a secondary arch... The next step is that I am proposing to FESCo that they consider a proposal to have PPC become a secondary arch for Fedora 12."
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[[User:Jwboyer|Josh Boyer]] announced<ref>http://jwboyer.livejournal.com/31831.html</ref> that, contrary to previous reports of doom, <code>deltarpms</code> may in fact make it into Fedora 11.
  
 
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<references/>

Revision as of 12:47, 10 May 2009

Planet Fedora

In this section, we cover the highlights of Planet Fedora - an aggregation of blogs from Fedora contributors worldwide.

http://planet.fedoraproject.org

Contributing Writer: Adam Batkin

General

Matthew Garrett explained[1] that there have been some patches submitted to ALSA that should clear up issues that some older ThinkPads have experienced with the volume controls and mixer levels.

Silas Sewell described[2] how Puppet can be used to manage large networks. "Puppet is an open source configuration management tool written in Ruby. It allows a systems administrator to define how a system should be configured using Puppet’s declarative language. Each Puppet client pulls its catalog at a regular interval and figures out how to make the catalog definitions true for the local operating system."

Silas also packaged[3] Scribe, "a server for aggregating log data streamed in real time from a large number of servers" (written by Facebook).

Venkatesh Hariharan quoted[4] Andy Grove (former Chairman and CEO of Intel) "comparing how patents have become like the mortgage-backed securities that caused the current financial meltdown".

Adam Williamson updated[5] the Fedora Bug Process wiki page. "One significant thing it formalizes was discussed at the QA meeting this morning: what happens when a Rawhide bug gets fixed." Adam also "re-arranged it in a more logical order, wikified it, and added a lot more detail on bits of the process, states, and resolutions that weren’t previously covered. It also now explicitly mentions which resolutions and states are valid for Fedora and which aren’t."

Jesse Keating mused[6] about the similarities between cooking popcorn (mmm popcorn...) and releasing software.

Valent Turkovic wrote[7] about installing OpenVAS, the Open Vulnerability Assessment System (a fork from Nessus after it went closed-source) in Fedora.

Samuel Iglesias shared[8] some basic vim tips. Regardless of your preferred editor, vi is generally installed everywhere so it is useful to know the basic.

Jeremy Katz followed-up[9] from his previous post (mentioned in FWN Issue 174) on the relevance of PPC as a primary Fedora architecture. At this week's Fedora Board meeting, "the Board voted and decided that from the Board level, PPC is no longer required to be a primary arch." Jeremy added "That does not mean that PPC is now automatically a secondary arch... The next step is that I am proposing to FESCo that they consider a proposal to have PPC become a secondary arch for Fedora 12."

Josh Boyer announced[10] that, contrary to previous reports of doom, deltarpms may in fact make it into Fedora 11.