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Contributing Writer: [[User:Abatkin|Adam Batkin]]
 
Contributing Writer: [[User:Abatkin|Adam Batkin]]
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This week is an amalgamation of posts from the past two weeks. Two for the price of one!
  
 
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=== General ===
 
=== General ===
  
[[User:Mso|Martin Sourada]] took a look<ref>http://mso-chronicles.blogspot.com/2009/10/mark-difference-ugly-fonts-in-fedora.html</ref> at font antialiasing and what makes fonts look ugly. In a further post, Martin answered<ref>http://mso-chronicles.blogspot.com/2009/10/answer-to-why-is-my-design-blurry.html</ref> the more general question "Why is my design blurry?"
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[[User:Ajamison|Andrew Vermilya Jamison]] took a look<ref>http://blogs.andyjamison.com/andy/linux-trials/fedora-community-beta-looks-sweet/</ref> at the new Fedora Community<ref>https://admin.fedoraproject.org/community/</ref> (Beta) site. "This is a great hub for communication in the distribution and promises to add new features that will make it more useful to other non Package contributing groups in Fedora...I can very well see this becoming a portal for the average Fedora user to: Check forum replies to topic you create, Reporting bugs using the Bugzilla API (would make it far easier to report a bug), Search the Smolt DB for hardware that works on Fedora, Tracking Wiki discussions and pages you might be involved with. All that and so much more, this site has great potential."
 
 
In the continuing journey of <tt>libguestfs</tt> [[User:Rjones|Richard W.M. Jones]] added<ref>http://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/28/libhivex-windows-registry-hive-extractor-library/</ref>,<ref>http://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/29/hivexget-get-values-from-a-windows-registry-hive/</ref>,<ref>http://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/29/virt-win-reg-get-at-the-windows-registry-in-your-windows-guests/</ref> support for working with the Windows registry form a Linux guest. Apparently you can also<ref>http://rwmj.wordpress.com/2009/10/30/fuse-support-for-libguestfs/</ref> mount guest filesystems on the host filesystem using FUSE (the example provided even mounts a Windows guest's NTFS filesystem to a Linux host).
 
 
 
[[User:Timlau|Tim Lauridsen]] demonstrated<ref>http://fedora.rasmil.dk/blog/?p=167</ref> a new feature of <tt>yum</tt> in Fedora 12: history, "that makes it possible to see what happened in part of a transaction and redo/undo past transactions."
 
 
 
[[User:Pfrields|Paul W. Frields]] outlined<ref>http://marilyn.frields.org:8080/~paul/wordpress/?p=2837</ref> some of the new features to be found in the Fedora 12 beta. and encouraged<ref>http://marilyn.frields.org:8080/~paul/wordpress/?p=2846</ref> anyone who finds an issue to report it! Don't assume that someone else will have already filed a bug.
 
 
 
Paul also reprinted<ref>http://marilyn.frields.org:8080/~paul/wordpress/?p=2848</ref> a posting from the Fedora Advisory Board mailing list about the mission of Fedora, its goals and target audience.
 
 
 
[[Peter Hutterer|Peter Hutterer]] explained<ref>http://who-t.blogspot.com/2009/10/x11r75-released-but-what-is-it.html</ref> what goes in to the X Windowing system release (now that X11R7.5 has been released).
 
  
[[MairinDuffy|Máirín Duffy]] displayed<ref>http://mairin.wordpress.com/2009/10/28/fedora-12s-default-wallpaper/</ref> the new default wallpaper slated for Fedora 12. Shiny!
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[[User:Ujjwol|Ujjwol Lamichhane]] examined<ref>http://ujjwol.com.np/sugar-the-cooler-desktop/</ref> the Sugar desktop. "Most of you, Linux users have always been lim­ited to the two big desk­top names in Linux. GNOME and KDE today rep­re­sent the Linux desk­top. But there exist other desk­top envi­ron­ment along with these two; XFCE, LDE etc. All these desk­top environment was made with a nor­mal desk­top or lap­top in mind but one desk­top was made with small screen and chil­dren in mind. Yes, the Sugar; the XO’s desk­top from Sugar Labs...Though named as child's desk­top envi­ron­ment, I found Sugar as easy as GNOME, as plas­mic as KDE and as light­weight as XFCE."
  
[[RichardHughes|Richard Hughes]] built<ref>http://blogs.gnome.org/hughsie/2009/10/28/gnome-color-manager/</ref> a tool (still in its early stages) to deal with ICC Color management under GNOME.
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[[RichardHughes|Richard Hughes]]' GNOME Color Manager progressed<ref>http://blogs.gnome.org/hughsie/2009/11/02/gnome-color-manager-progress/</ref> further with a website<ref>http://projects.gnome.org/gnome-color-manager/</ref> and mailing list<ref>http://mail.gnome.org/mailman/listinfo/gnome-color-manager-list</ref>. Feature-wise, the calibration process is now easier, and and there is initial scanner support<ref>http://blogs.gnome.org/hughsie/2009/11/05/gnome-color-manager-and-scanners/</ref>.
  
[[User:Alexh|Alex Hudson]] investigated<ref>http://www.alexhudson.com/blog/2009/10/30/corporate-lobbying-against-free-software/</ref> some ugly corporate lobbying against free software.
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Revision as of 23:12, 15 November 2009

Planet Fedora

In this section, we cover the highlights of Planet Fedora[1] - an aggregation of blogs from Fedora contributors worldwide.

Contributing Writer: Adam Batkin

This week is an amalgamation of posts from the past two weeks. Two for the price of one!

General

Andrew Vermilya Jamison took a look[1] at the new Fedora Community[2] (Beta) site. "This is a great hub for communication in the distribution and promises to add new features that will make it more useful to other non Package contributing groups in Fedora...I can very well see this becoming a portal for the average Fedora user to: Check forum replies to topic you create, Reporting bugs using the Bugzilla API (would make it far easier to report a bug), Search the Smolt DB for hardware that works on Fedora, Tracking Wiki discussions and pages you might be involved with. All that and so much more, this site has great potential."

Ujjwol Lamichhane examined[3] the Sugar desktop. "Most of you, Linux users have always been lim­ited to the two big desk­top names in Linux. GNOME and KDE today rep­re­sent the Linux desk­top. But there exist other desk­top envi­ron­ment along with these two; XFCE, LDE etc. All these desk­top environment was made with a nor­mal desk­top or lap­top in mind but one desk­top was made with small screen and chil­dren in mind. Yes, the Sugar; the XO’s desk­top from Sugar Labs...Though named as child's desk­top envi­ron­ment, I found Sugar as easy as GNOME, as plas­mic as KDE and as light­weight as XFCE."

Richard Hughes' GNOME Color Manager progressed[4] further with a website[5] and mailing list[6]. Feature-wise, the calibration process is now easier, and and there is initial scanner support[7].