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[[User:Jspaleta|Jef Spaleta]] continued<ref>http://jspaleta.livejournal.com/38486.html</ref> writing about "the NSF workshop on software sustainability for cyberinfrastructure" and the mismatch that often occurs between the length of grant funding and expected software lifetimes and lifecycles. [[User:Chitlesh|Chitlesh Goorah]] followed-up<ref>http://clunixchit.blogspot.com/2009/03/fel-position-paper-for-national-science.html</ref> with the abstract of the Fedora Electronic Lab position paper from the workshop. Chitlesh later posted<ref>http://clunixchit.blogspot.com/2009/03/how-we-shaped-fel.html</ref> some information on FEL's place in the open source Electronic Design Automation (EDA) world.
 
[[User:Jspaleta|Jef Spaleta]] continued<ref>http://jspaleta.livejournal.com/38486.html</ref> writing about "the NSF workshop on software sustainability for cyberinfrastructure" and the mismatch that often occurs between the length of grant funding and expected software lifetimes and lifecycles. [[User:Chitlesh|Chitlesh Goorah]] followed-up<ref>http://clunixchit.blogspot.com/2009/03/fel-position-paper-for-national-science.html</ref> with the abstract of the Fedora Electronic Lab position paper from the workshop. Chitlesh later posted<ref>http://clunixchit.blogspot.com/2009/03/how-we-shaped-fel.html</ref> some information on FEL's place in the open source Electronic Design Automation (EDA) world.
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[http://tieguy.org/ Luis Villa] wrote<ref>http://tieguy.org/blog/2009/03/28/deliberative-nirvana-and-software-design-myopia-mar-2009-edition/</ref> about "deliberative nirvana and software design myopia". He cited the White House's Open For Questions<ref>http://www.whitehouse.gov/openforquestions/</ref> site, built using tools like Google Moderator and App Engine, allowing it to scale on a technological level without any realistic limitations but with results that may not perfectly reflect the United States due to social/demographic limitations of the technology.
  
 
<references/>
 
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Revision as of 21:21, 29 March 2009

Planet Fedora

In this section, we cover the highlights of Planet Fedora - an aggregation of blogs from Fedora contributors worldwide.

http://planet.fedoraproject.org

Contributing Writer: Adam Batkin

General

Dave Malcolm developed[1],[2] a command line app called show that allows for access to various log files through an SQL-like interface. It supports aggregates and can handle Apache access logs, /var/log/messages and /var/log/secure and various others using backends from Augeas[3] for configuration files like /etc/passwd.

Paul W. Frields explained[4] how to convert virtual disk images between various formats using utilities from qemu.

Rakesh Pandit wrote[5] a "Report for National Institute of Technology Hamirpur Software Activity Workshop" describing an event where students were trained in software development using Free and Open Source Software.

Nicu Buceli announced[6] that the Open Clipart Library has reached its goal of 10,000 images.

Richard W.M. Jones posted[7] a visualization of RPM dependencies by size, as part of his quest to build a minimal Fedora installation. A later followup noted[8] that very different results occur depending on how the dependencies are traversed (in this case, breadth-first traversal versus depth-first). He then released[9] a tool, rpmdepsize[10] to allow users to generate their own dependency visualizations.

James Morris described[11] some security subsystem changes going into the 2.6.29 kernel.

Jef Spaleta continued[12] writing about "the NSF workshop on software sustainability for cyberinfrastructure" and the mismatch that often occurs between the length of grant funding and expected software lifetimes and lifecycles. Chitlesh Goorah followed-up[13] with the abstract of the Fedora Electronic Lab position paper from the workshop. Chitlesh later posted[14] some information on FEL's place in the open source Electronic Design Automation (EDA) world.

Luis Villa wrote[15] about "deliberative nirvana and software design myopia". He cited the White House's Open For Questions[16] site, built using tools like Google Moderator and App Engine, allowing it to scale on a technological level without any realistic limitations but with results that may not perfectly reflect the United States due to social/demographic limitations of the technology.