From Fedora Project Wiki

 
(One intermediate revision by the same user not shown)
Line 4: Line 4:
  
 
== Description ==
 
== Description ==
As it is known, the Greek alphabet was used in majuscule form for over a millenium before the miniscule letters gradually replaced it until they became the official script in the 9th century A.D. Thereafter, majuscule letters were confined to sparce use as initials or elaborate titles until the Italian Renaissance.
+
As it is known, the Greek alphabet was used in majuscule form for over a
 +
millennium before the minuscule letters gradually replaced it until they became
 +
the official script in the 9th century A.D. Thereafter, majuscule letters were
 +
confined to sparse use as initials or elaborate titles until the Italian
 +
Renaissance.
  
The new art of Typography, as well as the need of the humanists to mimic the ancient Greco-Roman period brought back the extensive use of the majuscule letterforms in both Latin and Greek typography. Greek books of the time were printed using the contemporary Byzantine hand with which they combined capital letters modeled on the Roman antiquity, i.e. with thick and thin strokes and serifs. At the same time the byzantine majuscule tradition, principally used on theological editions, remained alive until the early 19th century.
+
The new art of Typography, as well as the need of the humanists to mimic the
 +
ancient Greco-Roman period brought back the extensive use of the majuscule
 +
letter-forms in both Latin and Greek typography. Greek books of the time were
 +
printed using the contemporary Byzantine hand with which they combined capital
 +
letters modelled on the Roman antiquity, i.e. with thick and thin strokes and
 +
serifs. At the same time the Byzantine majuscule tradition, principally used on
 +
theological editions, remainned alive until the early 19th century.
  
GFS Ambrosia has the main characteristics of the majuscule forms of the early Christian tradition.
+
GFS Ambrosia has the main characteristics of the majuscule forms of the early
 +
Christian tradition.
  
 
It has been designed by George D. Matthiopoulos.
 
It has been designed by George D. Matthiopoulos.
Line 27: Line 38:
 
| OFL
 
| OFL
 
| [[rhbug:454171|454171]]
 
| [[rhbug:454171|454171]]
|
+
| [[koji:gfs-ambrosia-fonts|gfs-ambrosia-fonts]]
|
+
| [[pkgdb:gfs-ambrosia-fonts|gfs-ambrosia-fonts]]
 
|}
 
|}
 
{{admon/note | Packager |
 
* Once a package has been approved, add the corresponding:
 
** '''Koji page''' ⑤ pointer (for example [[koji:dejavu-fonts|dejavu-fonts]]).
 
** '''pkgdb page''' ⑥ pointer (for example [[pkgdb:dejavu-fonts|dejavu-fonts]]).
 
}}
 
  
  
Line 79: Line 84:
 
{{:Fonts_SIG_signature}}
 
{{:Fonts_SIG_signature}}
  
[[Category:In-progress fonts]] [[Category:International fonts]] [[Category:Decorative fonts]]
+
[[Category:Packaged fonts]] [[Category:International fonts]] [[Category:Decorative fonts]]

Latest revision as of 22:14, 16 January 2009

A page of the Fonts Special Interest Group

GFS Ambrosia majuscule Greek font

Description

As it is known, the Greek alphabet was used in majuscule form for over a millennium before the minuscule letters gradually replaced it until they became the official script in the 9th century A.D. Thereafter, majuscule letters were confined to sparse use as initials or elaborate titles until the Italian Renaissance.

The new art of Typography, as well as the need of the humanists to mimic the ancient Greco-Roman period brought back the extensive use of the majuscule letter-forms in both Latin and Greek typography. Greek books of the time were printed using the contemporary Byzantine hand with which they combined capital letters modelled on the Roman antiquity, i.e. with thick and thin strokes and serifs. At the same time the Byzantine majuscule tradition, principally used on theological editions, remainned alive until the early 19th century.

GFS Ambrosia has the main characteristics of the majuscule forms of the early Christian tradition.

It has been designed by George D. Matthiopoulos.

Characteristics

Homepage Format & features License Review reference Koji page pkgdb page
Greek Font Society OTF OFL 454171 gfs-ambrosia-fonts gfs-ambrosia-fonts


Style Faces Scripts
Sans Serif Other R B I BI Other Latin Greek Cyrillic Other
Variable Monospace Variable Monospace


Idea.png
Fonts in Fedora
The Fonts SIG takes loving care of Fedora fonts. Please join this special interest group if you are interested in creating, improving, packaging, or just suggesting a font. Any help will be appreciated.