From Fedora Project Wiki

(Use new traceback URL)
(clarify using a Live image)
 
(3 intermediate revisions by the same user not shown)
Line 1: Line 1:
 
{{QA/Test_Case
 
{{QA/Test_Case
|description=This test case is intended to introduce a failure, and validate anaconda is able to properly handle the failure and report the issue to bugzilla.  This test case relies on an [http://jlaska.fedorapeople.org/updates/traceback.img updates.img] that will intentionally cause the installation to fail in a manner that is non-destructive to your existing system.  For more information in using an updates.img, see [[Anaconda/Updates]].
+
|description=This test case is intended to introduce a failure, and validate that anaconda is able to enter a debug mode to retrieve detailed crash information
 
|actions=
 
|actions=
# Boot the installer by any available means (CD, DVD, boot.iso or PXE).  When booting, you must direct the installer towards an [http://jlaska.fedorapeople.org/updates/traceback.img updates.img] using this method below.<pre>updates=http://jlaska.fedorapeople.org/updates/traceback.img</pre>  
+
# Boot the installer by any available means
# When prompted, make language and keyboard selections.
+
#* If you're running from the Live image, you need to start anaconda from a terminal by running the command <pre>$ liveinst</pre> instead of just clicking on an icon.
# Depending on your installation method, you maybe prompted for a remote installation source. Make a selection and continue.
+
# If you know how to make Anaconda crash, you can do so. Otherwise use Anaconda's [http://lists.fedoraproject.org/pipermail/test/2012-September/110149.html fake exception handling trigger] - switch to a different terminal and run the following command: <pre>kill -USR1 `cat /var/run/anaconda.pid`</pre> Switch back to the installer, an error prompt should be displayed after a few seconds (you might need to click on some UI element to achieve that, or hit ''refresh'' in a text mode).
# Upon entering stage#2 of the installer, you will be presented with a failure dialog. Select '''Debug'''
+
# Enter a debug mode using the failure prompt
# Execute some commands in debug mode
+
#* On a Live image, you need to manually switch back to the terminal which you ran <code>liveinst</code> from
 +
# Execute some commands in the debug mode, e.g.: <pre>(Pdb) locals()</pre>
 +
# Use ''continue'' to return back to the failure prompt: <pre>(Pdb) continue</pre>
 +
#* On a Live image, you need to switch back to anaconda manually
 
|results=
 
|results=
# The installer presents a failure dialog and offers an option to save the failure report.
+
# The installer presents a failure prompt and offers an option to enter the debug mode
# Debug shell appears on tty1
+
# You are switched to a debug shell
# Commands are executed successfully in debug shell
+
# Commands are executed successfully in debug shell  
 +
# ''continue'' returns you back to the failure prompt and it becomes responsive again (you can press its buttons)
 
}}
 
}}
  
 
[[Category:Recovery Test Cases]]
 
[[Category:Recovery Test Cases]]

Latest revision as of 09:08, 3 December 2014

Description

This test case is intended to introduce a failure, and validate that anaconda is able to enter a debug mode to retrieve detailed crash information


How to test

  1. Boot the installer by any available means
    • If you're running from the Live image, you need to start anaconda from a terminal by running the command
      $ liveinst
      instead of just clicking on an icon.
  2. If you know how to make Anaconda crash, you can do so. Otherwise use Anaconda's fake exception handling trigger - switch to a different terminal and run the following command:
    kill -USR1 `cat /var/run/anaconda.pid`
    Switch back to the installer, an error prompt should be displayed after a few seconds (you might need to click on some UI element to achieve that, or hit refresh in a text mode).
  3. Enter a debug mode using the failure prompt
    • On a Live image, you need to manually switch back to the terminal which you ran liveinst from
  4. Execute some commands in the debug mode, e.g.:
    (Pdb) locals()
  5. Use continue to return back to the failure prompt:
    (Pdb) continue
    • On a Live image, you need to switch back to anaconda manually

Expected Results

  1. The installer presents a failure prompt and offers an option to enter the debug mode
  2. You are switched to a debug shell
  3. Commands are executed successfully in debug shell
  4. continue returns you back to the failure prompt and it becomes responsive again (you can press its buttons)