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{{QA/Test_Case
 
{{QA/Test_Case
|description=This test case checks that very basic live migration between two Fedora 12 hosts works correctly.  NOTE: if you don't know about the qemu monitor, and don't want to know about it, you can skip this test-case and go on to [[QA:Testcase Live Migration using libvirt/virsh]]
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|description=This test case checks that very basic live migration between two Fedora 12 hosts works correctly.  NOTE: if you don't know about the qemu monitor, and don't want to know about it, you can skip this test-case and go on to [[QA:Testcase Live Migration using libvirt/virsh]].  However, these instructions are useful for debugging, so they are included here as a test case.
 
|actions=
 
|actions=
# On the source machine, start up the guest with a small amount of memory, say 512MB or so.
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# On the source machine, start the guest using virsh (yes, we will use virsh just for this first part). Once the guest is started, find the guest using:<code>ps -efwwww | grep qemu-kvm</code>.  Copy the *entirety* of the command-line to a file on the host called
 
#  
 
#  
 
# Make sure that the /var/lib/libvirt/images directory is shared via NFS.  Edit /etc/exports, and add a line like:<br><code>/var/lib/libvirt/images *(rw,no_root_squash)</code>.  Then run <code>service nfs start</code>, and the  
 
# Make sure that the /var/lib/libvirt/images directory is shared via NFS.  Edit /etc/exports, and add a line like:<br><code>/var/lib/libvirt/images *(rw,no_root_squash)</code>.  Then run <code>service nfs start</code>, and the  

Revision as of 13:56, 15 September 2009

Description

This test case checks that very basic live migration between two Fedora 12 hosts works correctly. NOTE: if you don't know about the qemu monitor, and don't want to know about it, you can skip this test-case and go on to QA:Testcase Live Migration using libvirt/virsh. However, these instructions are useful for debugging, so they are included here as a test case.


How to test

  1. On the source machine, start the guest using virsh (yes, we will use virsh just for this first part). Once the guest is started, find the guest using:ps -efwwww

Expected Results

  1. hello