From Fedora Project Wiki

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* Here's an example /etc/fstab line that shows how to mount an NFS server over IPV6:
 
* Here's an example /etc/fstab line that shows how to mount an NFS server over IPV6:
  
             [2001:470:8:c53:20e:cff]:/export /mnt nfs  defaults  0 0
+
             [2001:470:8:c53:20e:cff::1]:/export /mnt nfs  defaults  0 0
  
 
* An good example to try is to mount a nfs filesystem via an ipv6 address:
 
* An good example to try is to mount a nfs filesystem via an ipv6 address:

Revision as of 20:20, 7 June 2011

IPv6 Testing on NFS should be similar to IPv4 NFS, and when specifying ipv6 address, it needs to be enclosed in square brackets. Link-local and site-local IPv6 addresses must be accompanied by an interface identifier. See the nfs(5) manpage for details:

  • Here's an example /etc/fstab line that shows how to mount an NFS server over IPV6:
           [2001:470:8:c53:20e:cff::1]:/export /mnt nfs  defaults  0 0
  • An good example to try is to mount a nfs filesystem via an ipv6 address:
           # mount -t nfs '[2001:470:8:c53:20e:cff:fec6::1]:/export' /mnt/foo
  • On the server side, if you're restricting access by subnet you'll also need to explicitly export to your ipv6 subnet as well. Here's an example line in /etc/exports that is exporting to both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses.
            /home 192.168.10.0/24(rw,insecure) [2001:470:8:c53::/64](rw,insecure)