From Fedora Project Wiki

Line 1: Line 1:
IPv6 Testing on NFS should be similar to IPv4 NFS, and when specifying ipv6 address, it needs to be enclosed in square brackets. Link-local and site-local IPv6  addresses must be accompanied by an interface identifier. See the '''nfs(5)''' manpage for details:
+
IPv6 Testing on NFS should be similar to IPv4 NFS. If you can resolve hostnames to IPv6 addresses, then you everything should just work. If you can't, then when specifying an IPv6 address, it needs to be enclosed in square brackets. Link-local and site-local IPv6  addresses must be accompanied by an interface identifier. See the '''nfs(5)''' manpage for details:
  
 
* Here's an example /etc/fstab line that shows how to mount an NFS server over IPV6:
 
* Here's an example /etc/fstab line that shows how to mount an NFS server over IPV6:

Revision as of 20:25, 7 June 2011

IPv6 Testing on NFS should be similar to IPv4 NFS. If you can resolve hostnames to IPv6 addresses, then you everything should just work. If you can't, then when specifying an IPv6 address, it needs to be enclosed in square brackets. Link-local and site-local IPv6 addresses must be accompanied by an interface identifier. See the nfs(5) manpage for details:

  • Here's an example /etc/fstab line that shows how to mount an NFS server over IPV6:
           [2001:470:8:c53:20e:cff::1]:/export /mnt nfs  defaults  0 0
  • An good example to try is to mount a nfs filesystem via an ipv6 address:
           # mount -t nfs '[2001:470:8:c53:20e:cff:fec6::1]:/export' /mnt/foo
  • On the server side, if you're restricting access by subnet you'll also need to explicitly export to your ipv6 subnet as well. Here's an example line in /etc/exports that is exporting to both an IPv4 and IPv6 subnet.
            /home 192.168.10.0/24(rw,insecure) [2001:470:8:c53::/64](rw,insecure)