From Fedora Project Wiki

(note use of self-signed https cert by default)
(criterion is now Basic, not Alpha)
 
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{{Template:Associated_release_criterion|Alpha|cockpit-management-interface}}
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{{Template:Associated_release_criterion|Basic|cockpit-management-interface}}
  
 
{{QA/Test_Case
 
{{QA/Test_Case

Latest revision as of 15:40, 1 February 2018

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Associated release criterion
This test case is associated with the Basic_Release_Criteria#cockpit-management-interface release criterion. If you are doing release validation testing, a failure of this test case may be a breach of that release criterion. If so, please file a bug and nominate it as blocking the appropriate milestone, using the blocker bug nomination page.


Description

This test case checks that Cockpit is enabled and accessible after a Fedora Server installation, as required in the Server/Technical_Specification.

Setup

  1. Install the Fedora Server release you wish to test, in graphical or text mode, making as few choices as possible and making the most simple and obvious choices where a choice is required.

How to test

  1. Boot the installed system, and check that Cockpit is running and accessible:
    sudo systemctl status cockpit.socket should show the service as enabled and running without errors
    sudo firewall-cmd --list-all should show the cockpit service
  2. Connect to the Cockpit web interface on the test system from another system with a web browser pointed to http://server:9090 ; the Cockpit management interface should show up. You can also use https://server:9090 , but unless you changed the server certificate from the default, it will be self-signed and the browser will show a warning or refuse to connect

Expected Results

  1. As far as you can reasonably test, Cockpit must be enabled and accessible on the test system after installation