From Fedora Project Wiki
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Right now, to do a remote re-install or upgrade on a running Fedora system, you could do something like this:
 
Right now, to do a remote re-install or upgrade on a running Fedora system, you could do something like this:
  
1. Copy images/pxeboot/vmlinuz and images/pxeboot/initrd.img to the target system and massage /boot/grub/grub.conf to include a section for them with the appropriate anaconda options.
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# Copy images/pxeboot/vmlinuz and images/pxeboot/initrd.img to the target system and massage /boot/grub/grub.conf to include a section for them with the appropriate anaconda options.
1. Reboot the system.
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# Reboot the system.
1. Either remotely control the install with VNC, or pray that kickstart works correctly.
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# Either remotely control the install with VNC, or pray that kickstart works correctly.
  
 
HP-UX has a tool called [http://docs.hp.com/en/B2355-90970/index.html Ignite-UX]  which, among other things, can be used to start and monitor remote installs.  It makes it possible to easily manage dozens of installs.  http://docs.hp.com/en/B2355-90970/ch04s03.html explains how, with screenshots.
 
HP-UX has a tool called [http://docs.hp.com/en/B2355-90970/index.html Ignite-UX]  which, among other things, can be used to start and monitor remote installs.  It makes it possible to easily manage dozens of installs.  http://docs.hp.com/en/B2355-90970/ch04s03.html explains how, with screenshots.
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With a system like this, a remote re-install or upgrade would be as simple as this:
 
With a system like this, a remote re-install or upgrade would be as simple as this:
  
1. Add the system to the GUI as a target.
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# Add the system to the GUI as a target.
1. Select install/upgrade in the GUI.
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# Select install/upgrade in the GUI.
1. Answer some basic questions (for example, pick a install type such as server/workstation/whatever).
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# Answer some basic questions (for example, pick a install type such as server/workstation/whatever).
1. Sit back and watch.
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# Sit back and watch.
  
 
It seems like there should be a way to manage (or at least monitor) random PXE installs (not started from the GUI) as well.
 
It seems like there should be a way to manage (or at least monitor) random PXE installs (not started from the GUI) as well.

Revision as of 21:00, 13 June 2008

Right now, to do a remote re-install or upgrade on a running Fedora system, you could do something like this:

  1. Copy images/pxeboot/vmlinuz and images/pxeboot/initrd.img to the target system and massage /boot/grub/grub.conf to include a section for them with the appropriate anaconda options.
  2. Reboot the system.
  3. Either remotely control the install with VNC, or pray that kickstart works correctly.

HP-UX has a tool called Ignite-UX which, among other things, can be used to start and monitor remote installs. It makes it possible to easily manage dozens of installs. http://docs.hp.com/en/B2355-90970/ch04s03.html explains how, with screenshots.

Fedora currently has kickstart support in anaconda for automating installs and the system-config-kickstart GUI for building kickstart configs. All that Fedora is lacking to have a tool like Ignite-UX is a basic GUI (that probably could be based on system-config-kickstart) and some way of getting status from anaconda remotely. A way to also control anaconda remotely (to do things like abort an install/upgrade, answer certain prompts, etc.) would be ideal.

With a system like this, a remote re-install or upgrade would be as simple as this:

  1. Add the system to the GUI as a target.
  2. Select install/upgrade in the GUI.
  3. Answer some basic questions (for example, pick a install type such as server/workstation/whatever).
  4. Sit back and watch.

It seems like there should be a way to manage (or at least monitor) random PXE installs (not started from the GUI) as well.

It might be interesting to look into sharing ideas/code with some of the Xen provisioning tools.

- StevenPritchard