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==Installation Notes==
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{{header|docs}}
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{{Docs_beat_closed}}
  
Admonition("important", "Fedora Installation Guide", "To learn how to install Fedora, refer to http://docs.fedoraproject.org/install-guide/.") 
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===LVM Thin Provisioning support in Anaconda===
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The Fedora installer now supports creating thinly provisioned LVM volumes in both the graphical interface and automated (kickstart) installations. This change includes a new automatic partitioning variant as well as new options to create thin volumes in custom partitioning.
  
Admonition("tip", "Installation issues not covered in these release notes", "If you encounter a problem or have a question during installation that is not covered in these relese notes, refer to [[FAQ|Fedora FAQ]] and [[Bugs/Common]]) 
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===Rsyslog no longer part of the default installation===
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The '''rsyslog''' logging service is no longer being installed by default. All logging is now being handled by the systemd journal. Users requiring the rsyslog service should install it manually.
  
'''Anaconda''' is the name of the Fedora installer. This section outlines issues related to '''Anaconda''' and installing Fedora 10
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To access the journald log, use the following command:
 
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<pre>
Admonition("note", "Downloading Large Files", "If you intend to download the Fedora DVD ISO image, keep in mind that not all file downloading tools can accommodate files larger than 2 GiB in size. <code>wget</code> 1.9.1-16 and above, <code>curl</code>, and <code>ncftpget</code> do not have this limitation, and can successfully download files larger than 2 GiB. '''BitTorrent''' is another method for downloading large files. For information about obtaining and using the torrent file, refer to http://torrent.fedoraproject.org/.") 
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journalctl
 
 
'''Anaconda''' tests the integrity of installation media by default. This function works with the CD, DVD, hard drive ISO, and NFS ISO installation methods. The Fedora Project recommends that you test all installation media before starting the installation process and before reporting any installation-related bugs.  Many of the bugs reported are actually due to improperly-burned CD or DVDs.
 
 
 
This <code>mediacheck</code> function is highly sensitive, and may report some usable discs as faulty. This result is often caused by disc writing software that does not include padding when creating discs from ISO files.  To use this test, at boot time hit any key to enter the menu.  Then press the '''[Tab] ''' key, add the option <code>mediacheck</code> to the parameter list, and press '''[Enter] '''.
 
 
 
After you complete the <code>mediacheck</code> function successfully, reboot to return the system to its normal state.  On many systems, this results in a faster installation process from the disc.  You may skip the <code>mediacheck</code> option when rebooting.
 
 
 
Admonition("important", "Bit<code></code>Torrent Automatically Verifies File Integrity", "If you use '''Bit<code></code>Torrent''', any files you download are automatically validated. If your file completes downloading, you do not need to check it. Once you burn your CD or DVD, however, you should still use <code>mediacheck</code> to test the integrity of the media.") 
 
 
 
To perform memory testing before you install Fedora, press any key to enter the boot menu, then select ''Memory Test''.  This option runs the '''Memtest86''' standalone memory testing software in place of '''Anaconda'''. '''Memtest86''' memory testing continues until you press the <code>Esc</code> key.
 
 
 
Admonition("note", "<code>Memtest86</code> Availability", "You must boot from Installation Disc 1, the DVD, or a rescue CD in order to use this feature.") 
 
 
 
Fedora 10 supports graphical FTP and HTTP installations. However, the installer image must either fit in RAM or appear on local storage, such as Installation Disc 1. Therefore, only systems with more than 192MiB of RAM, or which boot from Installation Disc 1, can use the graphical installer. Systems with 192MiB RAM or less fall back to using the text-based installer automatically. If you prefer to use the text-based installer, type <code>linux text</code> at the <code>boot:</code> prompt.
 
 
 
=== Changes in Anaconda ===
 
 
 
* Built-in support for resizing ext2, ext3, and ntfs partitions.
 
* Support for installation to encrypted block devices, including the root filesystem.
 
* Consolidated network booting ISO image, replacing old <code>boot.iso</code>, <code>diskboot.img</code>, and <code>rescuecd.iso</code>.
 
* Second stage installer location now independent of software package location.
 
* Native installation to x86 and x86_64 machines using EFI and booting via <code>grub</code>.
 
* Hardware probing and detection now based on HAL and <code>udev</code>.
 
* Support for persistence in Live images on USB flash media.
 
 
 
=== Installation Related Issues ===
 
 
 
* When PXE booting and using an .iso file for the installation media via NFS, you are now required to add method=nfsiso:server:/path to the command line.
 
 
 
==== IDE Device Names ====
 
 
 
Use of ''/dev/hdX'' on i386 and x86_64 for IDE drives has changed to ''/dev/sdX''.  See notes about the importance of labeling devices for upgrades from releases before Fedora 7, and partition limitations.
 
 
 
==== IDE RAID ====
 
 
 
Not all IDE RAID controllers are supported. If your RAID controller is not yet supported by <code>dmraid</code>, you may combine drives into RAID arrays by configuring Linux software RAID. For supported controllers, configure the RAID functions in the computer BIOS.
 
 
 
==== Multiple NICs and PXE Installation ====
 
 
 
Some servers with multiple network interfaces may not assign eth0 to the first network interface as BIOS knows it, which can cause the installer to try using a different network interface than was used by PXE.  To change this behavior, use the following in pxelinux.cfg/* config files:
 
 
 
<pre>IPAPPEND 2
 
APPEND ksdevice=bootif
 
 
</pre>
 
</pre>
  
The configuration options above causes the installer to use the same network interface as BIOS and PXE use. You can also use the following option:
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For more information about the journal, see http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/the-journal.html.
<pre>ksdevice=link
 
</pre>
 
  
This option causes the installer to use the first network device it finds that is linked to a network switch.
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===Sendmail no longer part of the default installation===
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The '''sendmail''' mail transport agent is no longer a part of the default installation. Any packages previously using this program, such as <code>cron</code>, will now deliver their output into the system log by default. Sendmail remains available for manual installation for users who require it.
  
=== Upgrade Related Issues ===
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==Unversioned docdirs==
 
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Per package documentation is now installed into unversioned /usr/share/doc/packagename directories. Previously the directory contained the package's version in addition to its name.
Refer to http://fedoraproject.org/wiki/DistributionUpgrades for detailed recommended procedures for upgrading Fedora.
 
 
 
==== Emacs ====
 
 
 
If you are upgrading to Fedora 9 and use <code>emacs</code>, you must upgrade to the latest version of <code>emacs</code> for your prior release to ensure a clean upgrade. Fedora 8 users must have <code>emacs-22.1-10.fc8</code> or later, while Fedora 7 users must have <code>emacs-22.1-7.fc7</code>.
 
 
 
==== SCSI driver partition limits ====
 
 
 
Whereas older IDE drivers supported up to 63 partitions per device, SCSI devices are limited to 15 partitions per device.  '''Anaconda''' uses the <code>libata</code> driver in the same fashion as the rest of Fedora, so it is unable to detect more than 15 partitions on an IDE disk during the installation or upgrade process.
 
 
 
If you are upgrading a system with more than 15 partitions, you may need to migrate the disk to Logical Volume Management (LVM).  This restriction may cause conflicts with other installed systems if they do not support LVM.  Most modern Linux distributions support LVM, and drivers are available for other operating systems as well.
 
 
 
==== Disk partitions must be labelled ====
 
 
 
A change in the way that the linux kernel handles storage devices means that device names like <code>/dev/hdX</code> or <code>/dev/sdX</code> may differ from the values used in earlier releases. '''Anaconda''' solves this problem by relying on partition labels or UUIDs for finding devices. If these are not present, then '''Anaconda''' presents a warning indicating that partitions need to be labelled and that the upgrade can not proceed.  Systems that use Logical Volume Management (LVM) and the device mapper usually do not require relabeling.
 
 
 
===== To check disk partition labels =====
 
 
 
To view partition labels, boot the existing Fedora installation, and enter the following at a terminal prompt:
 
<pre>/sbin/blkid
 
</pre>
 
Confirm that each volume line in the list has a <code>LABEL=</code> value, as shown below:
 
<pre>/dev/hdd1: LABEL="/boot" UUID="ec6a9d6c-6f05-487e-a8bd-a2594b854406" SEC_TYPE="ext2" TYPE="ext3"
 
</pre>
 
 
 
===== To set disk partition labels =====
 
 
 
For ext2 and ext3 partitions without a label, use the following command:
 
<pre> su -c 'e2label /dev/example f7-slash'
 
</pre>
 
For a VFAT filesystem use <code>dosfslabel</code> from the <code>dosfstools</code> package, and for NTFS filesystem use <code>ntfslabel</code> from the <code>ntfsprogs</code> package.  Before rebooting the machine, also update the file system mount entries, and the GRUB kernel root entry.
 
 
 
===== Update the file system mount entries =====
 
 
 
If any filesystem labels were added or modified, then the device entries in <code>/etc/fstab</code> must be adjusted to match:
 
<pre> su -c 'cp /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.orig'
 
su -c 'gedit /etc/fstab'
 
</pre>
 
An example of a mount by label entry is:
 
<pre> LABEL=f7-slash  /  ext3  defaults  1 1
 
</pre>
 
 
 
===== Update the grub.conf kernel root entry =====
 
 
 
If the label for the / (root) filesystem was modified, the kernel boot parameter in the grub configuration file must also be modified:
 
<pre> su -c 'gedit /boot/grub/grub.conf'
 
</pre>
 
A matching example kernel grub line is:
 
<pre> kernel /vmlinuz-2.6.20-1.2948.fc6 ro root=LABEL=f7-slash rhgb quiet
 
</pre>
 
 
 
===== Test changes made to labels =====
 
 
 
If partition labels were adjusted, or the <code>/etc/fstab</code> file modified, then boot the existing Fedora installation to confirm that all partitions still mount normally and login is successful. When complete, reboot with the installation media to start the installer and begin the upgrade.
 
 
 
==== Upgrades versus fresh installations ====
 
 
 
In general, fresh installations are recommended over upgrades, particularly for systems that include software from third-party repositories.  Third-party packages remaining from a previous installation may not work as expected on an upgraded Fedora system.  If you decide to perform an upgrade anyway, the following information may be helpful:
 
 
 
* Before you upgrade, back up the system completely.  In particular, preserve <code>/etc</code>, <code>/home</code>, and possibly <code>/opt</code> and <code>/usr/local</code> if customized packages are installed there.  You may wish to use a multi-boot approach with a "clone" of the old installation on alternate partition(s) as a fallback. In that case, create alternate boot media, such as a GRUB boot floppy.
 
 
 
Admonition("important", "System Configuration Backups", "Backups of configurations in <code>/etc</code> are also useful in reconstructing system settings after a fresh installation.") 
 
 
 
* After you complete the upgrade, run the following command:
 
 
 
<pre>rpm -qa --last > RPMS_by_Install_Time.txt
 
</pre>
 
 
 
Inspect the end of the output for packages that pre-date the upgrade.  Remove or upgrade those packages from third-party repositories, or otherwise deal with them as necessary.  Some previously installed packages may no longer be available in any configured repository.  To list all these packages, use the following command:
 
<pre>su -c 'yum list extras'
 
</pre>
 
  
=== Kickstart HTTP Issue ===
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[[Category:Docs Project]]
When using a Kickstart configuration file via HTTP, kickstart file retrieval may fail with an error that indicates the file could not be retrieved. Click the ''OK'' button several times without making modifications to override this error successfully. As a workaround, use one of the other supported methods to retrieve Kickstart configurations.
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[[Category:Draft documentation]]
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[[Category:Documentation beats]]

Latest revision as of 18:47, 20 October 2013

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Beat Closed on Wiki
Work on beats has now moved to git at https://pagure.io/fedora-docs/release-notes. If you have changes or additions, please contact the docs team via #fedora-docs, docs@lists.fedoraproject.org, or with the release-notes BZ component.


LVM Thin Provisioning support in Anaconda

The Fedora installer now supports creating thinly provisioned LVM volumes in both the graphical interface and automated (kickstart) installations. This change includes a new automatic partitioning variant as well as new options to create thin volumes in custom partitioning.

Rsyslog no longer part of the default installation

The rsyslog logging service is no longer being installed by default. All logging is now being handled by the systemd journal. Users requiring the rsyslog service should install it manually.

To access the journald log, use the following command:

journalctl

For more information about the journal, see http://0pointer.de/blog/projects/the-journal.html.

Sendmail no longer part of the default installation

The sendmail mail transport agent is no longer a part of the default installation. Any packages previously using this program, such as cron, will now deliver their output into the system log by default. Sendmail remains available for manual installation for users who require it.

Unversioned docdirs

Per package documentation is now installed into unversioned /usr/share/doc/packagename directories. Previously the directory contained the package's version in addition to its name.